WYWH: Immigration Law and the Arts – NICE WORK IF YOU CAN GET IN

 

By Katherine Jennings

 

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Photo credit: Center for Art Law.

On March 9, 2017, the Center for Art Law held an Art Law Mixer addressing the timely and provocative topic of immigration issues confronted by immigrant artists with the recent issuance of EO 13769, among other anti-immigrant measures. The 45th President commenced his presidency with a barrage of Executive Orders (EOs) including EO 13769*, which was signed by Trump on January 27, 2017, and restricted travel to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority countries and by all refugees. This EO has had far-reaching and devastating effects on immigrants including immigrant artists. It has wreaked havoc and confusion at the borders. Antagonizing foreign dignitaries, it has quickly been met with outrage and resistance by artist activists, art organizations, and lawyers.

 

The Georges Bergès Gallery, a stylish, SoHo gallery with an international focus, was the apt and welcoming site of the two-hour event, a first Center for Art Law (the “Center”) program to address immigration issues. It was composed of a wine and cheese reception and presentation by the founders of Lehach Filippa, an immigration law firm intended to serve creative professionals, followed by a Q&A. The discussion was moderated by Irina Tarsis, founder of the Center. Attendees included lawyers, artists and law students. After a brief warm up period during which attendees were encouraged “to talk to someone you didn’t come with,” Georges Bergès, the founder of the eponymous contemporary art gallery, spoke briefly to welcome all and to talk about the global perspective of his gallery. Bergès said his goal is to find authentic artists who are working in their own cultural context.

On to the substantive portion of the evening, Tarsis introduced Alejandro Filippa, Esq. and Michael Lehach, Esq, founding partners of Lehach Filippa. Lehach and Filippa spoke about the O-1 visa, commonly referred to as the “artist visa”, and the process of applying for work permits as a foreign artist. The current political climate and the effects of the anti-immigrant executive orders from President Donald Trump was also a topic of discussion. Filippa speculated that if the current precedent of an excessive number of executive orders is any indication, we will likely see more pushback and restrictions to immigration applications and processes in the future.

In order to qualify for an O-1 visa, or artist visa, an applicant must demonstrate “extraordinary ability by sustained national or international acclaim and must be coming temporarily to the United States to continue to work in the area of extraordinary ability.” Extraordinary ability in the field of arts means “distinction.” The Immigration Act of 1990 (Pub.L. 101-649, 104 Stat. 4978) was a national reform of immigration that, among other things, excluded artists and entertainers (as well as athletes and nurses) from qualifying for H-1B visas. Two new categories, O and P, were introduced for extraordinarily skilled foreigners in the arts and sciences. The 1990 legislation was created in response to the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 (Pub.L.), aka the McCarran-Walter Act, which was meant “to exclude certain immigrants from immigrating to America, post-World War II and in the early Cold War.

Clearly, both Lehach and Filippa enjoy their law practice and are competent, dedicated professionals. Their passion was evident as they spoke about the process of creating a solid application in order to achieve success in obtaining an artist visa. Advocating for their clients is predicated upon a solid application with supporting documentation. Involved in facilitating artist visas and residence applications, they represent foreign creative professionals who want to work in the US and creative organizations seeking foreign talent to work in their US office. Their clients are from diverse industries such as the performing arts, music, fashion, film, photography, design, fine art, journalism and more. These “extraordinary aliens” have included tattoo artists, dancers, and rappers. The client may seek Temporary Work Visas and /or Permanent Residence based on Extraordinary Ability.

Lehach and Filippa outlined the proof needed to establish a valid application for an artist visa. In addition to a detailed resume, the client should include all relevant documents regarding their awards, notable clients, publications and press, and work history. An applicant must provide at least eight references by professionals who can attest to the extraordinary abilities of the applicant. Noting that an applicant’s file can be huge, they also spoke about how they have to be from important and respected sources. Lehach noted that it would not do a client any good if he were to provide his private residence as a gallery that would show the applicant artist’s work. Rather, the gallery must be a well-known and established entity.

Another crucial component of the application is an itinerary of the events and activities in the beneficiary’s field of extraordinary ability. You must have a plan of what you will be doing, with whom and when, and it has to be concrete. This constitutes the Sponsorship aspect of the application. For example, the applicant must provide an established list of galleries who will show his or her work and a concomitant timeline. An Employer, an Agency, or an Agent is an acceptable sponsor. Finally, it is helpful for the applicant to have a portfolio as a physical manifestation of the accomplishments detailed in his or her resume.

Lehach and Filippa also spoke about the case of an application for an Artist Visa being rejected. They said it is much better to refile, than appeal, because the immigration agents can be fickle. Noting that it can often be difficult to decide what constitutes extraordinary ability, they said it is crucial to initially establish a solid case. Their law firm also deals with other immigration issues such as obtaining permanent residency, obtaining a green card, and asylum issues, and extension of artist visas.

The presentation was followed by a lively question and answer session. Both presenters showed obvious delight in their chosen field and were quick to address each question thoughtfully. One interesting tidbit revealed during the Q&A was that under the right circumstances there is even a provision for bringing an artist’s muse into the country on a visa. As for the immigration ban that instigated the theme of the evening, “a judge sitting on an Island in the Pacific” ruled it unenforceable.

*Note that on February 3, 2017, EO 13769 was given a temporary restraining order in a decision from the Ninth Circuit of the Court of Appeals. EO 13769 was revoked as of 3/16/17.

About the Author: Katherine Jennings is a lawyer and contemporary realist oil painter living in New Jersey. She has a B.A. in History from Duke University and a J.D. from Fordham University School of Law where she was an Associate Editor of the Fordham International Law Journal. Having practiced intellectual property and immigration law, she is also certified as an Art Law Mediator with VLA. She was recently accepted into the Copyist Program at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and her work may be viewed at www.katherinejenningsfineart.com.

 

WYWH: Legal Primer for Artists: Leasing Commercial and Residential Space & Dealing with Tax Issues

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Preoccupied with their work, artists often neglect reaching out to accountants and attorneys for advice on how best to brace themselves for possible issues they may encounter. Among an artist’s various legal considerations, contracts are perhaps the most important. Contracts can be forged for consignment agreements with galleries and auction houses or for the rental of commercial and personal leases. Although contracts are invaluable for artists, a litany of complications accompany the process of facilitating, signing and executing them.

On Thursday, June 9, 2016, New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), in cooperation with the New York State Bar Association’s Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law Section (EASL) and EASL’s Committee on Fine Art, gathered a panel of attorneys to offer basic legal information to artists. Attendees also included attorneys and students. The two-hour information session featured three speakers, all of whom shared valuable insights into issues pertaining to leasing commercial space, the rights of artists as residential tenants, and income and sales tax issues. The discussion was moderated by the co-chairs of EASL’s Committee on Fine Arts: Carol Steinberg, Esq. and Judith Prowda, Esq.

The first panelist to present was Jill A. Ellman, Esq. She is currently an Associate at M. Ross Associates, LLC, a law firm that handles all aspects of complex commercial litigations as well as transactional matters. Ellman focused on commercial leasing and how artists can ensure that they are protected from predatory practices such as exorbitant rent hikes, unauthorized changes to the lease and liability.

The second panelist to speak was David Frazer, Esq., Of Counsel to Himmelstein, McConnell, Gribben, Donoghue & Joseph, LLP. Having dedicated much of his career to advocating the rights of tenants, Frazer offered important advice concerning how artists can obtain the best leases while also protecting themselves. Frazer took great care to stress that artists “should not cut corners,” as record keeping is crucial to protecting one’s own personal interests. If a landlord or tenant requests any modifications to the lease, artists are encouraged to have the alterations signed by the landlord in writing and corroborated by all affected parties. Creating a paper trail of alterations to consignment agreements or real estate transactions helps protect the artist/tenant from possible abuses and in the event of future litigation.

Patricia Pernes, Esq., a Tax Consultant in the Business Tax Services sector and Art & Finance Group of a Big Four accounting firm, echoed Frazer’s sentiments regarding an artist’s responsibility to exercise due diligence in all formal transactions. Pernes, however, shifted the conversation from leasing issues to tax deductions applicable to artistic labor and the pieces themselves. Throughout her presentation, Pernes emphasized the distinction between a business and hobby, with the former classification being adequate for the deduction of materials and work-related expenses and the latter not receiving such protection. The principle element is whether the work is created in furtherance of a profit-driven business, in which case tax deductions can be used to incentivize growth. As with contracts, good record keeping is important for tax deductions as well.

The formal discussion was followed by a lively questions and answers session where attendees were able to ask the attorneys about legal provisions specific to their craft. Questions ranged from deductions that can be claimed by musicians for research to leasing for art nonprofit organizations. Ellman, Pernes and Frazer took the time to delve into each question’s nuance, applying their expertise to a motley of hypothetical situations and concluding what was, indeed, a priceless evening.

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only and is not meant to provide legal advice. Readers should not construe or rely on any comment or statement in this article as legal advice. Instead, readers should seek an attorney.

WYWH: You’ve Been Served – “Gerhard Richter Painting” and German Cultural Heritage Protection Law

By Elizabeth Weber, Esq.*

Screen shot 2015-04-17 at 2.41.44 PMOn February 3, 2016, the “You’ve Been Served” dinner and a movie event was hosted by the Brooklyn Law School Art Law Association. Attendees included attorneys, artists, art dealers, and students. The film screened, Gerhard Richter Painting, is a documentary that provides a glimpse, deliberately and slowly, into the life and artistic processes of visionary German artist Gerhard Richter. In the film, director Corina Belz highlights Richter’s creative process and allows viewers to watch Richter work on art in real-time. Interspersed in the film are clips from Richter’s youth, in which he discusses his views on art and life, which may or may not have changed for the artist over the course of his long and prolific life. The film attempts to provide viewers an intimate view of Richter’s past and his present: his escape from Eastern Germany at the age of 28, his trove of family photos that have an ambivalent effect on the artist, who wonders, “Who is this woman?” as he points to an image of his mother and wonders “Should I throw all of these away?” when trying to organize the photo trove in chronological order. In the film, Richter observed how American audiences tend to be more direct in commenting on his work, with one observer calling his gray series the English term for “scheisse.”

Following the screening of the  film, a partner in Sullivan & Worcester’s Litigation Department in Boston, Nicholas O’Donnell, led a discussion about German cultural heritage law. Mr. O’Donnell, who is the editor of the firm’s Art Law Report blog and an attorney working on a number of art law matters involving Germany – including the Restitution claim for the Guelph Treasure – discussed the hotly contested 2015-2016 German Cultural Heritage Protection Law. The first draft of this legislation proposed that all objects of national importance older than 50 years and valued at €150,000 or more must be granted an export license by the German government to leave German soil. A subsequent draft revision amended the value threshold, raising it from €150,000 to €300,000 and increasing the object’s age from 50 to 70 years. Additionally, the revision states that works of living artists may qualify as objects of national importance only with the artist’s permission. Having written about the proposed revisions already, O’Donnell described the law as archaic in a time when the art market is expanding beyond geographical national borders and becoming part of the larger global economy.

The legislation sparked outrage throughout the art world. Some artists, like Richter, and other art market experts condemned the act, with some experts portending the destruction of the German art market should the act come to pass. Mr. O’Donnell noted that other artists, including Georg Baselitz, went so far as to withdraw loaned works from German museums in protest of the law.

It was noted that other EU countries have export limitations on cultural valuables, including France and Italy, among others, and that Germany may be using these countries’ laws and overarching EU law as justification for its Cultural Heritage Protection Law. Indeed, the European Economic Community, one of the three founding pillars of the European Union, issued a regulation in 1993 that set uniform export controls for EU member countries. This regulation, titled “On the Export of Cultural Goods,” stated that “[t]he export of cultural goods outside the customs territory of the Community shall be subject to the presentation of an export license.” Accordingly, Germany’s Cultural Heritage Protection Law narrowed the geographic scope of the EU regulation by decreasing the acceptable export zone from the entire EU to Germany only.

A press release issued by the German Press and Information Office of the Federal Government acknowledged the EEC regulation, stating that “[s]ince 1993, EU law has required permits to export relevant cultural property outside the EU, for example to major art markets in Switzerland and the U.S.” The press release further indicates that “the German law sets more generous terms” than the aforementioned EU law.

Additionally, German authorities have characterized the law as an attempt to keep illegally-imported artifacts, especially those sold by ISIS to finance terrorist regimes, from being imported into and subsequently purchased and sold on German soil. Professor Monika Grütters, Germany’s Minister of State for Culture, stated that “[i]n view of the barbaric destruction of cultural heritage in the Middle East and many other areas of crisis and civil war, this move was long overdue, demanded by ethics and morals and by our identity as a nation of culture.”

During the Q&A session with Mr. O’Donnell, the discussion included possible loopholes within the  law, what permits for below market pricing and selling goods on the illicit black market. In addition, O’Donnell commented on the ramifications of the law vis-a-vis restitution claims that are currently pending against German institutions and individuals. Namely, would the law disallow the export of objects that qualify as “national treasure” after a restitution claimant succeeds in proving that property was looted from the family during the Nazi-era? It’s possible – if the draft German Cultural Heritage Protection Law passes this year, all works produced before 1946 (70 years before 2016) would be categorized as artifacts possibly restricted from export .

Cultural heritage issues are not exclusive to antiquities and remain a pervasive issue for contemporary artists. Different interests come into play between the governments seeking to protect and preserve their cultural identity and those who disseminate art to the international community. Although it is vitally important to protect cultural objects, governments must weigh the benefits derived from restricting the export of cultural patrimony against the curtailment of artists’ and art dealers’ rights. Namely, governments should take into account the far-reaching effects of cultural patrimony laws before restricting the flow of goods into the market to avoid the negative backlash that naturally follows such regulations.


Center for Art Law would like to thank Tess Bonoli and all the members of the Brooklyn Law School Art Law Association for their generosity and enthusiasm for the program. Many thanks to all who attended this event, with special thanks to Nicholas O’Donnell for his illuminating discussion of German cultural heritage issues.

About the Author: Elizabeth Weber is a lawyer living in Brooklyn, NY.  She graduated from the University of Florida Levin College of Law, where she received her certificate in Intellectual Property Law and served as an active member of the Art Law Society and the Journal of Technology Law and Policy. She is the Spring 2016 Postgraduate Fellow with Center for Art Law.

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Disclaimer: Reading “Wish You Were Here” a/k/a “WYWH” articles is no substitute to attending art law events, trials and programs. This and all http://www.itsartlaw.com articles are for educational purposes only. Readers should not construe or rely on any comment or statement in this article as legal advice. In case of legal questions, readers should seek a consultation with an attorney.

WYWH: Recap of “Art, Law and Crisis of Connoisseurship Conference”

By Marie H. Kramer*

Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 5.28.08 PM.pngOn Tuesday, December 1, 2015, the conference titled, “Art, Law and Crises of Connoisseurship” took place at The Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, London, UK. It was an international conference organized by ArtWatch UK, the Center for Art Law and the London School of Economics Cultural Heritage Law (UK). The program featured nineteen speakers, including artists, art historians, scientists and lawyers from Western and Central Europe as well as the United States, discussing how the ‘eye’ of the connoisseur interacts with art history and law. The conference was divided into three parts.

Part I: The Making of Art and the Power of Its Testimonies

Michael Daley, Director of ArtWatch UK and one of the program organizers, opened the conference with his essay “Like/Unlike; Interests/Disinterest,” which focused on the 1991 trial of Professor James Beck in Italy. Columbia U. Art History Professor Beck was accused of aggravated criminal slander (which carried a possible three year imprisonment) for his critical comments on a restoration of the sculpture, an effigy of Ilaria del Carretto in Lucca Cathedral. Beck had opined that the restorer ruined the sculpture by stripping its ancient patina to remove scratches and covering it with oil to create a new, shiny surface. Beck was ultimately acquitted of the charges setting precedent for the protection of future criticism of art restoration. After the trial, Beck and Daley joined forces to set up ArtWatch International, an organization dedicated to advocate for the protection of art against harmful restoration. The full story of the trials can be found in the book, Art Restoration: The Culture, the Business and the Scandal, co-written by Beck and Daley, which also includes criticism of the cleaning of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel frescoes. Daley showed examples of the restoration effects on the Sistine Chapel, where delicate layers of shadow that the master painted himself, were removed under the guise of ‘cleaning’ off dirt deposits.

Next, Euphrosyne Doxiadis, a Greek painter and scholar, spoke about her three decades of research and criticism of the Rubens attribution of Samson and Delilah in the National Gallery in London. Her research of the provenance and the work revealed engravings and other painted ‘eye witnesses’ (copies made of the original Samson and Delilah painting by Rubens) that she contends do not match the version currently hanging in the National Gallery. Additionally, using her artist’s eye and the availability of high-resolution digital photographs, she observed visible differences in brush strokes from known Rubens paintings, as well as the use of different pigments. This is especially important because Rubens only used different red pigments to shade and highlight his red areas, rather than the white pigment used to lighten the red dress of Delilah in the National Gallery version. Now, still, Doxiadis continues to struggle to get her opinions heard and recognized by the National Gallery.

Jacques Franck, a French art historian and painter trained in Old Master techniques, explained “[w]hy the Mona Lisa would not survive modern day conservation treatment.”  Franck, who is a recognized authority on Leonardo da Vinci, has conducted an extensive investigation of the techniques used by Leonardo, especially his ‘sfumato’ (‘smoky finish’) method, in which colors and shades melt into one. Franck, who believes he has discovered how Leonardo accomplished this technique based on his years of personal experimentation, explained to the conference attendees that Leonardo applied ultra-thin layers of glaze and pigment to make his transitions, each layer only a few micrometers thick. Franck suggests that, clearly, modern conservation techniques that ‘clean’ off any of these thin layers of glaze would destroy the Mona Lisa and other Leonardo masterpieces.

With a continued focus on Leonardo Da Vinci, Ann Pizzorusso discussed the master’s work from the perspective of a geologist. Pizzorusso is a US professional geologist and a Renaissance scholar. She explained how geology can be used as a tool for determining attribution. Specifically, she noted that Leonardo was renown, not only as an artist, but also as a scientist. Leonardo carefully studied geology and botany, making extensive drawings of the world around him. Comparing the Virgin of the Rocks compositions hanging in the Louvre and in the National Gallery of London, Pizzorusso noted some odd differences. She could plainly identify the various rock formations in the Louvre version, but not so with the National Gallery version. Additionally, she noted that the plants in the National Gallery version, according to a botanist she consulted, were imaginary – not the precise petals and foliage of actual plants – a mistake she doubts Leonardo would ever make. Thus, she questions the attribution of the painting in the National Gallery.

Robin Clark, Sir William Ramsay Professor Emeritus at University College London, an inorganic chemist and spectroscopist, gave a fascinating discussion of the use of Raman microscopy (RM) to identify pigments in the palette of artwork. He explained how every pigment has a distinct pattern of scattered photons that can be seen after focusing a laser beam through a microscope—collectively referred to as its Raman spectrum. This unique pigment identifier is invaluable in determining the composition of the pigments and can give tremendous insight for authenticating and dating artwork, as well as conservation and restoration.

Unfortunately Segolene Bergeon-Langle, France’s Honorary General Curator of Heritage and a member of the Louvre’s preservation and conservation committee, was unable to attend the conference, but she provided her remarks, and Daley presented her main points about the relationship between science and art. She contends that scientific analysis can cause restorers to overlook the original artists’ formulations. For example, during the restoration of Leonardo da Vinci’s The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne, in the Louvre, the Louvre’s international advisory committee on the restoration concluded that there was blanching (whitening) of a layer of varnish due to moisture or ageing that needed to be removed. Bergeon-Langle strongly disagreed, recognizing that the whitened area was not a later varnish to be removed, but was original to the painting – and perhaps a device used by the painter. She resigned from the restoration advisory committee in protest to the removal of the varnish and ‘over-cleaning,’ which left a visibly brighter composition. As an advocate for responsible stewardship, she contends that different fields of science and connoisseurship need to work together, so that the proper scientific questions are asked, and to permit art connoisseurs to work with scientists to collaboratively analyze and understand the true meaning of the results.

Michel Favre-Felix, a French painter and President of ARIPA (Association for the Respect of the Integrity of Artistic Heritage), discussed how some art restorers have dramatically changed certain works of art because they failed to look at the testimony of historical copies. One of the restorations he discussed was Veronese’s The Pilgrims of Emmaüs. The original, painted in 1560, had been changed more than once over the past 450 years; but there had been engravings made over the course of history, as well. Each restoration made changes that compounded prior mistakes. For example, a restoration in the 1950s deemed that the neckline on the cloak worn by the Pilgrim Luke was an overpaint from the 19th century, and removed it, notwithstanding an 18th century engraving showing that very neckline. These errors and others were compounded again in the Louvre’s more recent 2003-2004 restoration. The piece today makes a good example for the study of art restoration and perhaps, what not to do.

Kasia Pisarek, an independent art historian and research specialist on attribution in London, discussed modern attribution, specifically, the case of La Bella Principessa, a chalk and ink drawing on vellum depicting the profile of a girl appearing to be 15th century. It was recently attributed as a lost drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, but Pisarek proposed several arguments against such a finding. For example, she questioned the story that the vellum came from the Sforziad manuscript in Warsaw, noting that, among other problems, the hole punches that would have held the vellum sheet in place do not match the supposed original source of the drawing, the Sforza family album, which has five holes. Additionally, she discussed how the style and technique of the drawing are very different from Leonardo’s, but that several of his works and a sculptured bust by Cristoforo Romano might have been the sources for the drawing. The controversy will continue—indeed, convicted art forger Shaun Greenhalgh has recently claimed that he forged this “Leonardo” modeled after a girl he knew in 1975.

The first part of the conference was concluded with a brief discussion and a Q&A moderated by one of the conference organizers, Irina Tarsis, of Center for Art Law. A heated discussion ensued surrounding La Bella Principessa’s attribution that could only be categorized as a battle of experts.

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Part II: Righting the Record – Diverse Experts as Authority

Tatiana Flessas, professor of cultural heritage law at the London School of Economics and one of the conference organizers, introduced the early afternoon speakers, starting with Brian Allen, Chairman of the London Old Master dealers Hazlitt Ltd. Allen discussed what he termed ‘the new art history’—a change in the teaching of connoisseurship, especially in the UK, since the 1980s. He has noticed that universities are focusing on the social history of art, and not training art history students to differentiate artists by their stylistic traits. The effect is that fewer art historians will be able or willing to make attributions, and forgeries can be missed.

Peter Cannon-Brookes, former museum curator with strong interests in conservation and security, presented his essay, “Reconciling Connoisseurship with Different Means of Production of Works of Art.”  He follows Brian Allen’s discussion of the change in connoisseurship and how well modern art historians and connoisseurs really understand art from long ago. He questioned whether the more modern analysis of art—post-war era art to the present—could apply to art created in the past, and the processes used throughout the ages.   

Continuing with the theme of the changing nature of connoisseurship, Charles Hope, former Director of the Warburg Institute, discussed how modern connoisseurs have been unable or unwilling to support their basis for attributions. Often, two types of connoisseurship are at odds with one another: that based on expertise acquired over a long time and that based on using historical evidence and reason. In more distressing terms, Hope highlighted the fact that decisions about attribution are not based on the actual evidence to support the attribution, but left to a decision by vote.

Martin Eidelberg, Professor Emeritus of art history at Rutgers University, next discussed how science alone will not solve authentication issues, that there needs to be a collaboration among different disciplines in addition to extensive time for study. While creating a catalogue raisonné of the paintings of Watteau, he discovered how the provenance and scientific analysis of the paintings were not always a reliable means to determine accurate authorship and could lead to various misattributions.

Robin Simon, Editor of The British Art Journal and Honorary Professor of English, UCL, explained his discovery of multiple fake paintings, which were hanging in the MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club). Simon discovered that a single artist, between 1918 and 1948, painted over fifty paintings depicting cricket matches that purportedly dated from the 16th-20th centuries. After outing the pictures, they were removed from the MCC and quietly given to dealers, although a few fakes still remain in the MCC. Interestingly, Simon learned that the fake paintings were later sold to a wealthy collector who believed them to be authentic. So, the fakes have worked in two swindles.

A guest lecturer at the LSE and Director of the Art Law Foundation, Anne Laure Bandle, discussed her PhD paper on the sale of sleepers at auction and the liability of the auction house in such dealings. She focused on the notable Thwaytes suit against Sotheby’s for negligent advice regarding the value of The Cardsharps—allegedly missing the current expert attribution to Caravaggio. The High Court ruled in favor of Sotheby’s, finding that it had met its due diligence by using highly qualified experts who reasonably concluded that the quality was not sufficient to indicate a Caravaggio, rather than just a ‘follower.’

The next speaker, Elizabeth Simpson, Professor at the Bard Graduate Center in New York, departed from the field of fine arts to discuss the use of connoisseurship in the study of ancient art. Specifically, she explained how the ‘eye’ of the connoisseur has been used to identify the artists of ancient Greek artifacts. For example, by studying the stylistic traits of ancient Greek vases, scholars have been able to determine that two separate artists created works on two sides of the same vases – the Lysippides Painter (black-figure technique) and the Andokides Painter (red-figure). Connoisseurship also reunited disconnected ivory pieces stored in the Metropolitan Museum of Art into the ancient chair or throne from which they came. The ivory pieces had been excavated without any record of the source or context of the figures. An investigation of the pieces and comparison to similar ivories with known provenance revealed how they fit together and their source (Anatolia). 

Part III: Wishful Thinking, Scientific Evidence and Legal Precedent

During the final portion of the program, participants discussed the implications of expert connoisseurs and science in the courtroom.

Irina Tarsis, an art historian, New York attorney, Founder and Director of Center for Art Law, and one of the program organizers, contextualized the litigation involving the renown Knoedler Gallery. Although of impeccable reputation, the Knoedler closed after more than 160 years in business in the face of at least ten lawsuits against the Gallery for selling forgeries. The Gallery sold over fifty paintings, many of which were thought to be by well-known abstract expressionists. They had been consigned by Glafira Rosales, who has now admitted to the forgeries. Thus, the question is, what was the duty of the Gallery to ensure appropriate authentication?  Interestingly, Tarsis reported that none of the museum purchasers have brought suit yet. Several of the private collectors who have brought suit have settled. Thus, the issue of a gallery’s due diligence regarding authentication and attribution in these matters has not been decided by the courts. The question also remains whether there is insurance coverage for all of the remaining claims and potential claims. The usual insurance policy may cover theft or damage to works of art, but not necessarily for loss due to misattribution. Further, the Knoedler may have a policy covering errors and omissions by its staff, but unlikely covering acts of fraud. The message is clear that collectors and dealers cannot rely on the representations of even a highly reputable gallery alone, without performing their own due diligence into authentication to protect themselves. Between December 1st and December 10th, one of the two Knoedler cases slated to go to trial in the January 2016 was settled.

Nicholas Eastaugh, Founder/Director of Art Analysis and Research Ltd., London, discussed the science of analyzing fine arts – the term he uses is ‘technical art history and materials science.’  He performs chemical analyses of the materials used in a painting and searches for anomalies in those paintings. For example, he analyzed Red Picture With Horses, supposedly a 1914 painting by Campendonk, but found titanium white pigment, which was not available at that time, evidencing a forgery by Wolfgang Beltracchi. He also uses high resolution digital imaging, X-rays and ultraviolet fluorescence to see below the painted surface. Earlier sketches and drawings (pentimenti) can show the true artist’s creative process in altering the composition along the way, rather than someone who is simply making a copy.

Megan E. Noh, Associate General Counsel of Bonhams, discussed recent legal trends in authentication disputes. One important change is that artists’ foundations and authentication boards have disbanded or stopped issuing certifications of authenticity. For example, there are no longer boards to authentic works by Basquiat, Warhol or Lichtenstein. This trend is coupled with increased litigation concerning authenticity. Modern litigants rely more on scientific evidence, but it often becomes a battle of the experts. Authenticators, however, are understandably cautious in giving opinions for fear of liability. Noh suggested some possible solutions, such as indemnification agreements or ‘no sue’ agreements to protect authenticators. In New York, there is an attempt to amend the Art and Cultural Affairs Law to protect authenticators by requiring enhanced pleading by plaintiffs filing suit against authenticators, and fee shifting requirements for the prevailing party. Favorable case law may also help reduce liability for authenticators.  Indeed, since the conference, a French court has overturned a 2013 judgment that required art expert Werner Spies to reimburse a collector for the price of a work that turned out to be another Beltracchi forgery, but that Spies authenticated as genuine in a catalogue raisonné. The French court held that an authenticator for a catalogue is not to be held to the higher standard of care as that of an expert consulted in the sale of a work.

Conclusion:

This fascinating conference brought together international experts in various fields of art, art history, science and law. The speakers recognized that controversy abounds as experts continue to reach different opinions regarding attribution of works of art, as well as what efforts to make to properly conserve works of art. As the value of art generally rises, the stakes are high. Disagreements over attribution are increasingly brought into the courts, where the battle of the experts in connoisseurship and science is left to the decision of judges and juries (those furthest from the art world). The eye of an experienced connoisseur, who can distinguish artistic styles, is still desperately needed. The ability to perform such a close inspection and analysis should be supplemented by modern scientific advances, but should never be replaced. Papers from the conference are being prepared for publication in 2016. In the meantime, the take away from the conference is to do due diligence and seek unbiased opinions for authentication or intervention in art handling from a combination of sources, including connoisseurs and scientists.  The conference also raised topics that warrant further exploration, such as ethical guidelines for conservators and how to seek and determine a consensus in opinions.

Suggested Readings:

About the author: Marie H. KramerPennsylvania attorney living in the United Kingdom, studying art and cultural heritage law. She can be reached at marie@kramerlegalbriefs.com 

WYWH: Art Law Issue Spotting at the “New York Comic Con” (NYC)

By David Honig*

View from above of a small section of the showroom floor

New York Comic Con (“NYCC”) took place earlier this month, October 8-11, 2015 at the Jacob Javits Center. In addition to christening the new 7 train subway stop at 34th street and 11th avenue, which opened on September 13, 2015, NYCC celebrated its tenth anniversary with comics, panels, parties, games and of course cosplay. ”Cosplay” (costume play) is when someone dresses up as a character from a tv show, movie, comic or anime.

NYCC is not simply an opportunity to dress up, brows new publications, and meet the artists and writers behind works such as Saga, Batman, Afterlife with Archie, Daredevil and The Wicked + The Divine. Each year NYCC’s organizers invite producers, publishers, actors and anyone tangentially related to comics to tackle important subjects in the realm of these multi billion dollar industries. In 2015, panelists discussed the new books being put out by both major and independent publishers, diversity in comics and the comics industry ranging from racial diversity to sexual diversity of both characters and creators, legal issues, and the artistic value of comics in the greater cultural context. For example, two panels were dedicated to Will Eisner (1917-2005), who, along with Jack Kirby (1917-1994), is arguably the most important and influential figure in comics. Eisner’s importance is especially true when looking at his impact on transforming the comic book medium into a recognized art form.

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Cosplayers dressed as DC Comics characters gather for a group photo outside the Javits Center

The panels, “75 Spirited Years: Will Eisner & the Spirit” and “Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel,” were hosted by Geppi’s Entertainment Museum (the “Museum”) to coincide with an exhibit hosted in Baltimore celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Spirit, a character created by Eisner. One of the panels discussed the Museum exhibit as well as Eisner’s life and his impact on the industry. Panelists included Karen Green, the graphic novel librarian at Columbia University, as well as Denis Kitchen, founder of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund [CBLDF].

CBLDF is a non-profit organization established in 1986, dedicated to freedom of speech. Through donations the CBLDF helps pay for attorneys fees for cases related to first amendment issues and comics. In addition to helping comic readers, publishers and authors obtain legal services CBLDF also fights censorship.

CBLDF, had multiple representations at NYCC, in addition to having a booth on the showroom floor where signed copies of books created by famous supporters were sold, CBLDF hosted parties and panels The topics of this year’s CBLDF panels were banned comics and censorship.

Indeed, manifestations of art law, issues involving creative visual output and the law are not rare in the comics realm.  In addition to the predictable copyright, licensing, trademark and First Amendment disputes, other cases that have stemmed from the comics may be related to such unlikely practice areas as patent law. One striking example took place just this year, on June 22, 2015 when the Supreme Court of the United States decided Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC., a patent law case related to Spider-Man. In 1990 Stephen Kimble was awarded US Patent No. 5,072,856 titled “Toy web-shooting glove.” The abstract of the patent is as follows,

The combination of known components to produce a new toy shooting apparatus. A toy that makes it possible for a player to act like a spider person by shooting webs from the palm of his or her hand. The webbing material consists of string foam delivered from a hidden pressurized container through a valve incorporated into a glove worn by the player. A trigger mechanism enables the player to activate the valve at will by the exercise of pressure with the fingers of the hand wearing the glove.  

Spider-Man

Patent drawing of the apparatus

After independently inventing the “Toy web-shooting glove” and obtaining a patent Kimble tried to license or sell his patent to Marvel so it could create a line of toys modeled off of Spider-Man’s web shooters – the device Spider-Man created to shoot webs out of his hands. Marvel declined to license Kimble’s invention but went ahead with creating a line of toys modeled off of Spider-Man’s web shooters which it called the “Web Blaster.”

Kimble sued Marvel claiming its line of “Web Blaster” toys infringed his patent. Marvel and Kimble eventually settled the patent infringement suit and Marvel agreed to purchase the patent from Kimble and pay him a royalty on all future sales. The contract between Kimble and Marvel stated that Marvel would pay a royalty fee to Kimble but there was no specified end date, meaning Marvel would have to pay a royalty to Kimble for every “Web Blaster” sold even after the patent expired and stopped conferring exclusive use on its holder. Unbeknownst to Kimble or Marvel at the time they entered into the contract, a 1964 Supreme Court decision, Brullotte v. Thys Co., held that a patentee, the person who holds or initially obtains a patent, cannot receive royalties for a patent after the patent term expires. The patent term expires after a statutory period, currently 20 years after filing for all patents filed after June 8, 1995, at which point the information in the patent is dedicated to the public and the holder of the patent can no longer claim exclusive use. (From the Editors: more about art and patent law coming soon).

After discovering Brullotte, Marvel sought and received a declaratory judgment stating that it did not have to pay Kimble royalties after the patent term expired, even though the contract between Marvel and Kimble outlined an agreement to the contrary. Kimble appealed this decision all the way up to the Supreme Court. The ultimate issue in the case was whether the Supreme Court should overrule Brullotte in spite of stare decisis – a doctrine that says precedent should be followed and only overturned when absolutely necessary. Not only did the Supreme Court rule in favor of Marvel but it did so in such a way as to invoke one of Marvel’s most famous comics – Amazing Fantasy No. 15.

Amazing Fantasy No. 15, written by Stan Lee with art (or “pencils” in the comics world) by Steve Ditko, was published on August 10, 1962 introducing the world to Peter Parker and his alter ego – the Amazing Spider-Man. The final panel in the 1962 lead story ends on a somber image: Spider-Man’s back as he is walking through a concrete jungle with the moon high in the sky and a caption which includes the now famous phrase: “WITH GREAT POWER THERE MUST ALSO COME — GREAT RESPONSIBILITY!”

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© Marvel Comics, 1962

It seems that in the Court’s view, the power to overturn cases and change the law is akin to Peter Parker’s Spider-Man powers; as such in the closing paragraph of the majority opinion Justice Kagen cites the famous phrase above to illustrate why Brullotte should not be overturned. Where Spider-Man has the responsibility to use his powers to save anyone and everyone, the Supreme Court must use its power to overturn cases sparingly and only do so when stare decisis allows.

There must be a comic fan clerking at the Supreme Court, because in addition to quoting Amazing Fantasy 15, the majority opinion in Kimble makes a reference to the 1967 song “Spider-Man,” written by Paul Francis Webster and J. Robert Harris for the animated television series of the same name. The court made this reference while discussing the fact that the contract between Marvel and Kimble contained no end date and that the contract seemed to suggest Marvel would have to pay royalties “for as long as kids want to be like Spider-Man (by doing whatever a spider can).”

The Supreme Courts cite to Amazing Fantasy is just another in a long line of victories in establishing the value of comic books and the transformation of comic books into a recognized art form. What was once thought of as a curiosity for children has slowly evolved and become more accepted into mainstream culture. While visionaries like Will Eisner might have imagined a day that his art was hanging up in museums and being collected by Ivy League universities most of his contemporaries did not.

About the Author: David Honig is a post graduate fellows at the Center for Art Law. He is a member of the Brooklyn Law School class of 2015. While attending law school he focused his studies on intellectual property and was a member of the Brooklyn Law Incubator & Policy (BLIP) Clinic. He is currently pending admission to the New York and New Jersey state bars.  

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only and is not meant to provide legal advice. Readers should not construe or rely on any comment or statement in this article as legal advise. Instead, readers should seek an attorney.

WYWH: Forgeries and Fakes from “Fakes, Forgeries and Looted and Stolen Art”

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Ken Perenyi’s autobiographical keynote. NYUSCE program June 2015. Copyright Center for Art Law.

By Lindsay Dekter*

Following a multi-year investigation between 2011 and 2014, East Hampton art forger John Re was sentenced in May 2015 to five years in prison after nearly a decade of defrauding art collectors. Re passed off more than 60 paintings attributed to artists such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, amounting in a combined loss of roughly $2 million by his victims. Shortly after Re’s sentencing, New York University’s School of Professional Studies held its 2nd annual Art Crime and Cultural Heritage Conference in New York, dedicating one of the three days to the issue of art forgery.

One speaker, Meredith Savona, discussed the Re phenomenon and how people fall victim to these con artists. Others speakers addressed current issues regarding expert witness testimony and expert immunity, while New York State Senator, Betty Little, discussed an amendment to the New York Arts and Cultural Affairs Law that aims to strengthen legal protections for authenticators. The NYU program, co-organized by Jane C. H. Jacob of Jacob Fine Art, Inc. and the Art Recovery Group, included a controversial keynote address entitled Art Crime Scene: Forger Talks about Forgery, delivered by Ken Perenyi. Perenyi’s presentation included images of major auction house catalogues containing his forged landscapes, still lives, and period paintings, and was followed by a bemused round of applause. Questions and comments from the audience, particularly art lawyer John Cahill of Cahill Partners LLP, and art expert James Martin of Orion Analytical LLC, expressed outrage with the damage forgeries inflict on the art market and art historical scholarship. Cahill went so far as to offer pro bono services to those with possible and plausible Perenyi claims. Martin indicated that while stylistically Perenyi’s work is very strong, chemical analysis of his materials is an easy way to identify his work as inauthentic.

Although nothing new to the art world, both Re’s case and NYU’s conference highlight the damage art forgery causes, both to commerce and the historical record. Speakers at the NYU conference, like Meredith Savona, the FBI agent who filed the June 2014 complaint against Re, impressed upon the audience the importance of vigilance in preventing and identifying these crimes.

About the Author: Lindsay Dekter, Center for Art Law Intern (Fall 2015), is a graduate student at New York University in the Program in Museum Studies. She holds a BA in Cultural Geography and an MS in Historic Preservation. Her current studies focus on museums and legal issues, cultural heritage policy and preservation, ethics, provenance research, and restitution.

WYWH: Review of “Murder to Museums: Recent Cases and Ethical Considerations in Nazi Looted Art”

By Debra S. Friedmann*

On June 17, 2015, the New York County Lawyer’s Association (the “NYCLA”) hosted an event entitled “Murder to Museums: Recent Cases and Ethical Considerations in Nazi Looted Art,” with remarks by Raymond Dowd from Dunnington Bartholow & Miller LLP, and introduced by the Honorable Barbara Jaffe, acting justice in the New York State Supreme Court. Dowd is one of the program chairs of the Art Litigation and Dispute Resolution Practice Institute, scheduled to hold its 8th annual conference in November 2015.

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“La Bergere rentrant des moutons/Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep” (1886) Camille Pissarro

Dowd, who has represented numerous claimants with title dispute cases in U.S. courts, introduced the topic for the evening with a few examples of ongoing restitution cases, including the recent effort to return Camille Pissarro’s painting, “La Bergère Rentrent des Moutons,” from the University of Oklahoma. The concept of art restitution, Dowd explained, began with the Lieber Code, also known as Executive Order 100, ordered by President Lincoln in 1863 and later included in the Hague conventions in 1899 and 1907. The code sought to protect classical works of art and libraries and banned the sale or donation of art removed from enemy nations.

Recent movies such as “The Monuments Men” (2014) and “Woman in Gold” (2015) brought Nazi art restitution to the forefront of art and legal discussions, begging the question, how did the Nazis take possession of art collections that belonged to Jews? Dowd explained that the Nazi regime demanded regular declarations of property from Jews and systematically transferred ownership of all Jewish assets by forcing Jews to relinquish power of attorney to an assigned “Aryan trustee.” This Nazi system that funded their war efforts appears to abide by the law. Dowd suggested that the legal appearance of these sham transactions with blocked bank accounts has confused historians and judges alike when trying to decide if a piece of art was sold fairly or forcibly.

With so many stolen works scattered in museums around the world, Dowd questioned whether museums are doing enough to investigate their holdings and return the looted work to their rightful owners. Though the U.S. State Department has regularly shown support for Nazi restitution, the U.S. federal court system has nevertheless rejected many of these claims, and in some circumstances, ruled in favor of museums that have sued the Jewish heirs for extortion.

Dowd introduced some of the hurdles, such as laches (the undue delay in obtaining relief), statute of limitations, and the claim that the sales were voluntary, that he has incurred in his own work representing heirs of Holocaust survivors. In Dowd’s case In re Flamenbaum, the rejection of the laches argument to bar the return of a third century golden tablet belonging to the Temple of Ishtar was instrumental as support for other cases that similarly would need to argue against laches. This subject was particularly timely in light of the recent Cassirer v. Spain appellate decision against Claude Cassirer, heir to Lilly Cassirer who was forced to give up Camille Pissarro’s “Rue Saint-Honoré, Après-midi, Effet de Pluie” while fleeing from Nazi Germany. Recognizing national sovereignty, the court ruled that Spanish law rather than California law applied to  the case because, though the plaintiffs had a significant connection to California, the painting did not. According to Spanish law, if one possesses property in an obvious way for a certain period of time, ownership transfers to that individual.  Therefore, since the doctrine of adverse possession applied in this case, it did not matter that the painting in question was looted by the Nazis.

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“Seated Woman With Bent Left Leg” (1917) Egon Schiele

Dowd warned the audience that it is important to look skeptically at provenance research associated with works of art. As an example, Dowd discussed the case Bakalar v. Vavra, where he established that Franz (Fritz) Grunbaum, who owned a sizable collection of Egon Schiele works, was murdered in Dachau. Sotheby’s claimed in the listed provenance for the drawing by Egon Schiele, “Seated Woman With Bent Left Leg” (1917), that it was passed down to the widow and heirs and then sold voluntarily, when in reality no such transactions took place.

Dowd concluded that museums are not doing enough to research their collections and return stolen works, noting that if there is a theft in a transaction, the transactions that follow are irrelevant. Museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Toledo Museum of Art, the Detroit Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Guggenheim Museum, are still fighting and rejecting charges of looted Nazi art, refusing to return the works.

The CLE lecture, which drew an audience of approximately thirty people, ended with questions on what museums should do in response to claims of looted art and suggestions for what advocates can do to rectify the suppression of Nazi looted art claims.

Select Cases:

  • Bakalar v. Vavra, 619 F.3d 136, 2010 WL 3435375 (2d Cir. Sept 2, 2010)
  • Cassirer v. Kingdom of Spain, 616 F.3d 1019 (9th Cir. August 12, 2010)
  • De Csepel v. Republic of Hungary, 714 F.3d 591 (D.C. Cir. 2013)
  • Grosz v. Museum of Modern Art, 2010 WL 88003 (Jan. 6, 2010), aff’d (2d Cir. Dec. 16, 2010.)
  • Guggenheim v. Lubell, 153 A.D.2d 143, 153, 550 N.Y.S.2d 618, 624 (1st Dep’t 1990), aff’d 77 N.Y.2d 311, 321
  • Schoeps v. State of Bavaria, 2014 WL 2915894 (S.D.N.Y. June 27, 2014)
  • Menzel v. List, 267 N.Y.2d 804, 819 (Sup. Ct. N.Y. Co. 1966), modified 279 N.Y.S.2d 608 (1st Dep’t. 1967), modified and aff’d 24 N.Y.2d 91 (1969)
  • Museum of Fine Arts Boston v. Seger-Thomschitz, 623 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. Oct. 14, 2010)
  • Republic of Austria v. Altmann, 541 U.S. 677 (2004)
  • Toledo Museum of Art v. Ullin, 477 F. Supp.2d 802 (N.D. OH 2006)
  • Vineberg v. Bissonnette, 548 F.3d 50 (1st Cir. 2008)
  • Von Saher v. Norton Simon Museum of Art at Pasadena, 131 S.Ct. 379 (Oct. 4, 2010)

Additional Sources:

  • Dowd, Raymond J., Nazi Looted Art and Cocaine: When Museum Directors Take It, Call The Cops, 14 Rutgers Journal of Law and Religion 529 (2013)
  • Dean, Martin, Robbing The Jews: The Confiscation of Jewish Property in the Holocaust, 1933-1945 (Cambridge U. Press 2008)
  • Petropoulos, Jonathan, Art As Politics in The Third Reich (U. North Carolina Press 1999)
  • Petropoulos, Jonathan, The Faustian Bargain: The Art World In Nazi Germany (Oxford U. Press 2000)

*About the Author: Debra Friedmann is a rising second-year law student at the Georgetown University Law Center. She received a B.A. in History and Studio Art from Brandeis University. She may be reached at dsfriedmann@gmail.com.

Disclaimer:  This article is for educational purposes only and is not meant to provide legal advice. Readers are not meant to act or rely on the information in this article without attorney consultation.

Wish You Were Here: Sotheby’s Institute of Art (CA) Conference, January 2015

by Jessica Newman*

On January 30 and 31, the Sotheby’s Institute of Art gathered attorneys and art professionals together in Los Angeles, California for their Art Law Conference entitled “The Practice of Law in the International Art World.” The two-day expansive agenda featured twelve modules and nearly forty speakers, including artist Shepard Fairey giving an inspired keynote speech. The Conference addressed a number of issues at the confluence of art and law, including authenticity, looting, collecting, restitution, investment, public art, the future of art, and the art market. Following is a brief write up of the most memorable topics:

1. Liability v. Leadership: Advising Arts Organizations

Melody Kanschat, Executive Director of the Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University, chaired a panel entitled “Liability v. Leadership: Advising Arts Organizations,” which featured Stephen Clark (J. Paul Getty Trust), Fred Goldstein (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), David Galligan (Walker Art Center), and Eva Schieveld (Van Gogh Museum). As multidimensional institutions, museums face a myriad of issues that extend far beyond the world of art. The panel emphasized that general counsel should be a part of all senior management conversations and budget discussions. One common concern was the avoidance of conflicts of interest (both real and apparent), particularly when dealing with a board of trustees.

One question posed to the panel was whether a museum can invest in a company which is run by a member of the museum’s board. As with many legal questions, the answer is, “Yes, but…” Although some museums have a strict zero tolerance policy when it comes to such investments, it is possible to structure transactions in a manner that avoids direct conflicts of interest. In part, the soundness of such a transaction turns on who is making the decision. It is important to ensure that the transaction is done at arm’s length and that no one who will directly benefit is personally involved in the decision whether or not to invest. In addition, transparency and continued management play important roles in preventing conflicts from arising.

2. Restitution Panel

Jonathan Petropoulos moderated the Restitution Panel, which explored the continuing evolution of restitution claims. Although issues of restitution have been around for some time, they remain a major concern for purchasers, heirs, and museums alike. Lucian Simmons of Sotheby’s observed that investigation into potential restitution issues remains a steady part of his work even today. Accordingly, as Simon J.Frankel (Covington) reiterated, research into proper provenance is as important as ever, and several conference speakers strongly advocated title insurance. As for the future of the field, Lawrence M. Kaye (Herrick), identified Russia as the next potential hotspot for restitution claims if access to Russian archives and collections becomes a possibility.

3. Secured Transactions

The second day of the conference began with a panel on Secured Transactions, moderated by Franklin Boyd and featuring John Arena (Bank of America), Stephen D. Brodie (Feinstein), and Karen McManus (Jacqueline Silberman & Assocs. Inc.). Art as an alternative asset has become increasingly popular for wealthy investors looking to diversify their portfolios. Art can also be used as a financial tool without having to sell the works by using the art as collateral. However, this option is only open to a select number of collectors.

The target collector is one with at least $10 million in well-established works (i.e., Old Masters, Modern, etc.) which can be quickly and easily sold were such a sale to become necessary for the lender. These works are appraised and, from a collector’s perspective, title insurance is recommended. Additionally, art must be the “second way out” of the deal. In other words, the borrower must have demonstrated equity in other assets. For those who can meet these criteria, using art to finance loans can be an attractive option. The fact that the United States is the only country where owners can maintain control of their collateralized works makes this option particularly appealing.

4. Art Collecting in the Current Legal Market

“Art Collecting in the Current Legal Market,” panel which was chaired by Mary Rozell (Sotheby’s) and featured Carol Bradford (California Community Foundation), Josh Roth (United Talent Agency, formerly Glaser Weil), and Katie Tolson (Gurr Johns). Although the increasingly global and technology-driven world of art collecting makes it easier than ever to access art, it also poses a number of challenges for the contemporary collector. For instance, documents can now be forged with the push of a button. However, one area in which technology has significantly enhanced the collecting experience is in inventory management. Ensuring proper documentation of one’s inventory is vital and a number of new software options have emerged that can assist a collector in doing just that. These software programs range in price, but at a minimum it should offer the collector a means of inputting photographs, descriptions of the works and details such as collection history, exhibition history, location, and inventory number. Ms. Tolson described her firm’s custom-designed Art Collection Management Software, which offers collectors a sophisticated means of managing their collections.

Roth discussed the increasing use of Section 1031 like-kind exchanges as a tool that can be utilized to expand one’s collection. Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code, entitled “Nonrecognition of gain or loss from exchanges solely in like kind,” provides a means for investors to defer taxes on capital gain from the sale of a work of art. In effect, 1031 Exchanges provide a collector with an interest-free loan from the government that can be used to subsidize future acquisitions so long as certain conditions are met. First, this section does not apply to personal property, as it applies only to property used for business or investment purposes. The exact parameters for this requirement are somewhat vague, however a work purchased solely for personal display in one’s home is not likely to qualify. Defining a like-kind property in this context can be equally difficult as there is no definitive guideline as to what type of art would be of like-kind to another. For instance, it is conceivable that the IRS may determine that a sculpture is not of like-kind to a painting.

Lastly, there are strict timing and designation requirements which are intended to distinguish a 1031 Exchange from a taxable transaction in which the purchaser merely uses the proceeds from a previous sale to purchase a new property. There are several ways to structure such an exchange, though the forward, or deferred exchange is most common. Broadly speaking a forward exchange works as follows: upon the sale of a work, the collector can use a 1031 exchange to defer the gain by investing the proceeds in a like-kind replacement property (i.e. another work of art) of equal or greater value. The replacement work must be identified within 45 days of the initial sale, and the collector has 135 days to close the sale upon identification. The appeal of such exchanges is evident, and Roth expects that they will only continue to grow in popularity.

Over the course of the two days, several takeaways emerged. First, many of the traditional issues within the field of art law – looting, restitution, importing/exporting, authenticity – remain at the heart of any art law practice. Secondly, the search for new uses and new means of valuing art has produced a number of creative options for investment and exchange of art. These options, however, are complex and require thorough due diligence by all parties. Lastly, the digital age has brought with it a host of new challenges for collectors, museums, artists, and attorneys alike. At the same time, technological advances also are opening up the art world in exciting ways.

Selected Sources:

About the Author: Jessica Newman is a third year dual-degree student pursuing a Juris Doctor and a Masters in Art History at Duke University. She can be reached at Jessica.newman@lawnet.duke.edu.

Spotlight on Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts’ Creative Entrepreneurship Series

By Elena Kravtsoff, Esq.*

This year, Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts (WALA) held its annual autumn Creative Entrepreneurship Series from October 2nd to November 6th. Each week volunteer attorneys lectured on topics relevant to artists who are interested in commercializing their work: business formation, funding and leases, contracts and licensing, tax strategies, negotiation skills, and intellectual property, specifically copyrights and trademarks.

Vance “Head-Roc” Levy, WALA’s Arts Ambassador, and Maggie Gladstone, the organization’s Legal Services Director, explain that WALA saw the need for “a comprehensive ‘toolbox’ series of workshops” to add to the organization’s popular monthly general workshops, and so they implemented the Creative Entrepreneurship Series, which is now in its fourth year. Mr. Levy and Ms. Gladstone say that the series allows entrepreneurial creatives to “[e]xplore the basics of forming a business for [their] creative endeavors, from deciding whether to incorporate as a non-profit or for-profit entity, to understanding copyrights and trademarks, to contract and negotiation skills, and finally to taxes and leases.”

This year, Cynthia Gayton, founder of the Arlington-based law firm Gayton Law, presented the workshop on contracts and licensing. Ms. Gayton is a long time WALA volunteer attorney who got involved with the organization in 1996 at the recommendation of her intellectual property professor. She started by writing articles and case summaries for WALA’s newsletter, which evolved into presenting seminars. Ms. Gayton says that she has enjoyed the “different arts-related venues for the seminars,” and, that since she started presenting, she has found “the audience [] better equipped/knowledgeable about the legal issues they face.”

Brian Frankel of Washington D.C.’s Brian Frankel Law Firm, who was recently elected to the WALA Board of Directors, presented a workshop on funding and leases. Mr. Frankel says that the Creative Entrepreneurship Series “is a valuable and well attended part of the D.C. creative scene.” Mr. Frankel reports that he chose to present because he is able to speak with participants about a wide range of issues that he is interested in and because he “greatly enjoy[s] the questions and directions of conversation.” Mr. Frankel says that going in, he expected “good conversation, respectful and passionate members, diverse backgrounds, diverse interests.” His objective was to help clarify some issues for the attendees “so they could focus more on creating.”

Mr. Frankel says that he has seen the organization and promotion leading up to the events improve and points out greater attendance by law students who are trying to get a sense of the interdisciplinarity of the arts and law by coming to the workshops. Like Ms. Gayton, Mr. Frankel notes that the workshop attendees come more prepared and well informed, “which makes for a richer conversation on the nuanced issues of how law may apply.”

Benjamin Takis, the founder of the D.C.-based firm Tax-Exempt Solutions, and a semi-professional musician, presented the “Tax Strategies” workshop this fall. Mr. Takis has been involved with WALA since 2009 and explains that by presenting he attempts “to take some of the mystery out of tax law and business formation.” Mr. Takis says that he is always happy to present at workshops for WALA and that he enjoys “hearing about the different businesses artists in D.C. are starting.”

Rue Capri Brown, a freelance designer, attended several of workshops for the first time this year. Ms. Brown says that she has heard about WALA for decades but has not attended any workshops until now. Ms. Brown reports that she found the workshops interesting and relevant, and that she felt that the workshop serieswas a great way of reconnecting” her with “important legal issues” that she has neglected in her business. Ms. Brown says that the presenting attorneys were “top notch” and that she looks forward to attending future workshops. Musician Yoko K. reports that she attended WALA workshops about five years ago before coming to this year’s series. She points out that compared to five years ago, more attorneys who are interested in learning about artists’ needs are coming to the workshops to listen in. Yoko K. says that she enjoyed the all of the presenters’ enthusiasm and found the series very encouraging as she embarks on her creative venture.

Next year’s Creative Entrepreneurship Series is currently in the works, as is WALA’s general workshop schedule. Anyone who is interested in attending WALA’s educational events should visit www.waladc.org/events in order to stay up to date.

About the Author: Elena Kravtsoff is an attorney based in Washington, DC. She may be reached at elena.kravtsoff@gmail.com.

Disclaimer: This article is intended as general information, not legal advice, and is no substitute for seeking representation.

Alternative Alternatives: ALT2 Conference Review

By Jessica M. Curley

On 29 September 2014, Bonhams auction house, together with BigelowSands LLC, hosted the fourth ALT2 Conference at its Madison Avenue location in New York City, where about 100 attendees from a multitude of industries including banking, marketing, commodity trading, and law gathered to hear world leading experts in these fields discuss investments in “alternative alternative assets.” The three panels were dedicated to rare gems and diamonds, healthcare and entertainment royalty rights, and vintage cars. Some of the speakers included Susan Abeles, Director of US Jewelry, Roger Miller, CEO of Alchemy Copyrights and CIO the Bicycle Music Company, and Bruce Wennerstrom, Founder, Chairman and CEO of the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance. The half-day conference was followed by a wine tasting event lead by Jennifer Williams-Bulkeley, Managing Partner of AOC Investment Advisors.

An “alternative asset” is a newer type of asset that traditionally had not been included in a standard investment portfolio. Some “alternative assets” include hedge funds, venture capital, real property, and commodities. A distinguished class of alternative assets, so-called “alternative alternative assets,” has begun to increase in popularity and includes diamonds, fine art, stringed instruments, vintage cars, healthcare and entertainment royalty rights, wine and vintage watches.

At ALT2 event experts discussed how these alternative alternative assets have gained in popularity and are becoming increasingly accepted as a way to further diversify investment portfolios. For example, panelist Alan Landau, CEO and co-founding Partner of Novel Asset Management, attorney by training and graduate of Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, advised that the diamond industry is not highly regulated in general, and that because diamonds are not classified as a financial product, they are not regulated by securities laws despite their being utilized for investment purposes. Mahyar Makzani, Co-Founder & Joint Managing Director of Sciens Colour Diamonds Fund, who moderated the panel on diamonds, noted that his fund voluntarily provides clients with “comfort points” to fill the gap created by the lack of regulatory oversight of this specific asset class.

Experts on the music, healthcare and film royalty rights panel advised that these less institutionalized assets are governed by traditional US intellectual property law. Dempsey Gable, Managing Director & Founding Fund Manager of the Opportunity Fund within Alternative Investments of APG Asset Management, explained that under US copyright law, films and television shows can be licensed to provide low yield low risk investment opportunities for investors. Panelist Tadd Wessel, Managing Director of OrbiMed, advised on the complexities of the healthcare system, and spoke to ways in which US patent law affects investment decisions regarding healthcare royalties.

The final panel, dedicated to vintage cars, discussed the steadily increasing valuation of classic cars, and the asset class’ low volatility and low correlation to other alternative alternative asset classes. Panelist Eric Minoff, a Specialist in the Motoring Department at Bonhams, advised the audience on the rapid growth of motorcar sales at auction, noting the increasing investor interest in this type of asset. Bonhams recently auctioned a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta, which went for $38 million, making it the most valuable car to ever be sold at auction.

The panels seemed to strike a chord with attendees whose questions largely pertained to the regulation of certain asset classes, liquidity issues, and yield to risk ratios. The panel dedicated to royalty rights was most informative on the issue of regulation, and was of significant interest to attorneys, as this asset class is strictly governed and regulated by US intellectual property law. Regulation of diamonds and vintage cars is much less extensive, but both respective panels noted that increased investor interest could create a demand for heightened oversight. Liquidity potential also varied greatly among the various alternative alternative assets, as discussed by each panel. For example, whereas the ability to easily sell diamonds on the market make them highly liquid, copyright licenses, however, involve complex ownership and usage issues that prevent the asset from being easily alienable, and therefore have low liquidity. Yield to risk ratios also varied across the asset classes with film and TV shows providing a low risk low yield investment opportunity, while other tangible assets had a higher risk due the potential for physical damage or loss.

The ALT2 Conferences are by invitation only.

About the Author: Jessica M. Curley is a post-graduate fellow from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. She is pursuing her interest in art law and financial regulation in New York, and may be reached at jessicamcurleyATgmailDOTcom.